Additional information and resources as referenced in the book.


Appendices

Links

Guest Artist: Andrew Matusik

Errata Text Corrections

Errata Image Improvements


Appendices

Download Appendix B "The Business of Imagemaking"

Download Appendix C "Scanning Resolution"

Additional Information & Resources

Links to artists and resources mentioned in Chapter 1:

General:

History of Photography through 1920's

Website dedicated to Photomontage

Dada

Camille Silvy

Oscar Gustave Rejlander

Henry Peach Robinson

Raoul Hausman

Hannah Hoch Biography

Hannah Hoch Images

Kurt Schwitters Biography

Kurt Schwitters homepage in German

John Heartfield

Jerry Uelsmann

Duane Michaels

Interview with Duane Michaels

Diane Fenster

Maggie Taylor

Lyn Bishop

Glenn Wexler

Daniel Clark

David Bishop

Nick Vedros

John Paul Caponigro

Copyright Information:

United States Copyright Office of The Library of Congress

Copyright Crash Course

What is Copyright?

D-65 Seth Resnick's site with useful links to copyright and business resources.

Business and Professional Information:

ASMP

PPA

Books that address the business side of photography

The Business of Art Photography links

The Art of Business - a series of articles written for the creative professional.

Nine Simple Rules for Sustaining Success

Those Forgettable Fundamentals

Starting Fresh in 2005

Plan It. Bill It. Track It. Make Money.

Tax Deduction Fever

Plan for a Creative Retirement

Creating Your Future, One Month at a Time

Seven Simple Skills for Creating a Successful Presentation


Errata

Dear Readers:

Although I have done my very best to avoid mistakes Photoshop Masking & Compositing the gremlins of late nights, deadlines, and distractions have caused misprints to appear in the first printing of the book.

Thank you to all the attentive readers that have kindly pointed out these errors. I appreciate this very much and in case you find additional mistakes please let me know and I will post them here and correct them in future printings.

Chapter 2: Selection Strategies and Essentials

Page 35, caption for figure 2.2: Left and right callouts need to be switched

Page 37: Figure credit should read © John McIntosh

Page 42,caption for figure 2.17: I used a feather of 0, 5, 20, and 50.

Page 42, figure 2.17 The lower four images that show the results of different feathering values imply that higher feathering values reduce the size of the image. This is not true or intended. The feathering does affect both the width of the edge and the scale of the selection, but not the size of the image.

Page 45, caption for figure 2.20: Use the Polygon lasso tool to select geometric shapes.

Page 47. Switch figures 2.28 and 2.29.

Page 48/column 2/last paragraph: If an area you want to include in the selection is not selected, press the Shift key and draw along the missing contour with the Lasso or Marquee tool....

Page 54, right-hand column, fourth bullet: "The higher the Frequency, the faster the anchor points will be laid down" is not accurate. Photoshop lays down each point as fast as the next one. It is not a matter of how fast points are placed, but how often points are laid down. Higher frequency lends itself to a more accurate, higher-resolution picture or in this case, a more accurate, higher-resolution selection). Thanks to reader John S for this explanation.

Page 54/column 2/last bullet point: Is 'Pen Pressure' not stylus pressure.

Page 55/paragraph 1, reads: "...lower Width and Edge Contrast settings of 30 pixels and 5%.

Chapter 3: The Essential Select Menu

Page 70/right hand column: needs to read, “...illustrates how increasing the Fuzziness in increments of fifty...”

Page 79/column 1/step 2: Then select Layer > New > Layer Via Copy

Page 84/column 1: Delete the word ‘freeform’ before Lasso in paragraph 2 and step #1.

Chapter 4: Pen Tool Power

Page 98/caption for 4.13: Delete (cmd) and [crt] – as the command is simply option or alt.

Page 105/column 1: Then I click on the Exclude Path Area

Page 105/column 2/caption 4.32: Click on the Exclude Path Area Button in the Options Bar...

Page 106/column 2: Delete "he then combined the two exposures with an image of a kitchen, as explained in Chapter 6 . . ." and replace with “He then combined the two exposures as explained in Chapter 7, “The Power of Layer Masking”.

Chapter 5: Masks Are Your Friends

Page149/step 3, line 2, the "...Edit > Copy, Edit > Copy,..." needs to be "Edit > Copy, Edit > Paste...

Page 153/step 3: Add Select Image > Adjustments > Invert to reverse the tonal values of the mask.

Page 159/step 5: I refer to an "Image Adjustment button" when I mean the "Create New Adjustment Layer” button.

Chapter 6: Layers Are Your Friends

Page177/ figure 6.36, "Hard Light" needs to be "Hard Mix"

Page 182/column 1: Lock Image Pixels will not let you to use any painting tools on the layer, while allowing you to move and transform the layer contents.

Page 204/step 4 - delete the incorrect figure reference (figure 6.45)

Chapter 10: Selecting Translucency & Green Screen Techniques

Page 353 – please flop the position of the clouds and the gradient – so that the gradient is on top.

Page 370/step # 4 - ...and name them

Page 369/column 1/step #2 - Use Levels to dramatically MAKE the light background white...

Page 371/column 1/step #6 - Before returning to RGB please invert the large and Small alpha masks by clicking on each and then selecting Image > Adjustments > Invert.

Chapter 11: Image Execution & Photography

Page 394/column 1/caption 11.24: The closer the light is to the subject, the larger the light source, and the softer the shadows.

Page 401, figure 11.39: The circle should be on the second lightest square of the Macbeth Color Checker.


Errata Image Improvements

Chapter 2: Selection Strategies and Essentials

Figure 2.11
Figure 2.13
Figure 2.14
Figure 2.15
Figure 2.17
Figure 2.22
Figure 2.25a
Figure 2.26a
Figure 2.30
Figure 2.32a
Figure 2.32b
Figure 2.32c
Figure 2.41b
Figure 2.44
Figure 2.56
Figure 2.60a
Figure 2.67

Chapter 3: The Essential Select Menu

Figure 3.03a
Figure 3.18

Chapter 4: Pen Tool Power

Figure 4.12
Figure 4.13
Figure 4.32c

Figure 9.64b

Figure 12.115